We’ve all been the victim of believing myths when it comes to technology; maybe some of us still are. From thinking that cellphones give us cancer to believing that more bars on your phone gives you better cell service, people come up with the most logically digestible bullshit sometimes.

Here are six tech myths that people still believe in today, but probably shouldn’t:

1. The higher a Camera’s megapixels, the better the quality of the picture

I’m not going to lie, even I’ve been fooled by this. The first time I went to buy a digital camera, I looked for one with the highest megapixels before I settled on a Nikon. Pixels are basically millions of microscopic light sensors employed by digital cameras in order to turn a visual image into electronic signals. High pixel counts can improve the resolution needed for a finely detailed image, but that also means that individual pixels are really small which will leave you with much noisier images. No one wants that!

2. Apple Macbooks are immune to viruses

Strangely enough, many people believe that their Macintosh systems can’t catch viruses, but they might want to rethink that. Apple computers are actually just as susceptible to viruses as are PC’s. But to support these claims, people have come up with crazy theories that go as far as stating that Windows has more enemies than Apple and therefore is more of a victim to cyberterrorism. However, all these claims were debunked when a Trojan affected the malware of thousands of Apple computers in 2012.

3. You can charge a phone with a lemon

Yes, you read that correctly. As far as myths go, this has to be the most ridiculous one. The myth originated when a smartphone user decided it would be good idea to show the world that instead of electricity, he chooses to use lemons to charge his phone. This myth spread like wildfire and YouTubers all over the globe tried to test this theory out. However, the only problem here is that even though theoretically you could charge your phone with lemons, you’ll need at least a dozen lemons to produce merely 5 volts of charge, which obviously isn’t enough to get your phone to full charge. Maybe just stick to using a plug socket instead of ending up with thousands of violated lemons and a soggy charging cable.

4. Holding a magnet close to your computer will erase all its data

This technology myth isn’t exactly wrong. The only catch with this myth is that you require a really strong magnet in order to wipe out your computer’s data. You just don’t need to worry about bringing your fridge magnets too close to your computers.

5. Using your iPad’s charger with your iPhone will not affect its battery

Apple claims on its website that an iPad’s charger can not only be used with the iPhone but also your iPod, Apple Watch, and other products from Apple. In fact, many claim that using an iPad charger with an iPhone charges the latter much faster. However, Steve Sandler, founder and chief technical officer at electronics analysis company AEi Systems, has stated that using your iPad’s charger can stress out your iPhone’s battery. It might not be noticeable at first but with time, your phone’s battery will be greatly affected.

6. The incognito mode in your browser keeps you anonymous

This particular technology myth made people believe that using the incognito mode in their browser will keep their identity a secret. But what they don’t know is that the incognito mode just keeps the browser from recording your search history or importing your bookmarks. It also won’t automatically log in to your accounts, but no, it will not keep your identity hidden.

Although most of these technology myths have been debunked, we have all been fooled by them at some point. Now they only live in our memories making us laugh from time to time for believing in them in the first place.


https://thetempest.co/?p=141189
Tayyaba Rehman

By Tayyaba Rehman

Editorial Fellow