I think we can all agree that 2019 has been a hell of a year and politically – it has been draining.

We are now in the time of information overload. There is so much happening everywhere in the world, so much that deserves to be spoken about that can actually be accessed incredibly easily. But I’m not sure our minds were created to be able to take in everything, to have a stance on everything, all the time – it’s exhausting.

Nevertheless, 2019 has been one of the most important years because, in the face of all the bad, there has been so much room for good, so much space to share stories that may have been lost in previous years, so much room to grow as individuals and to educate ourselves about the world we live in.

Here are some of the most important stories of 2019.

1. The Holocaust isn’t the only genocide that Germany needs to be held accountable for by Julia Métraux

The Holocaust isn’t the only genocide that Germany needs to be held accountable for

The Holocaust is undoubtedly one of the one worst things that could have happened, however, unknown to many – it isn’t the only genocide that has occurred, not even in Germany. Julia explores the horrors that the Herero and Nama people endured in Germany so that they aren’t forgotten and hopefully one day will receive the reparations they deserve.

2. An art installation in Pakistan about police brutality faces censorship by Sabreena Memon

An art installation in Pakistan about police brutality faces censorship

Sabreena explores the intricate relationship that Pakistan has with Censorship by discussing an art installation named the Killing Fields of Karachi. This piece touches on important topics such as the effects of censorship and the importance of art as a means to start essential discussions.

3. In conversation with Aysha Baqir on her novel Beyond the Fields by Shehrbano Naqvi

In conversation with Aysha Baqir on her novel Beyond the Fields

Shehrbano talks to Aysha Baqir about her novel Beyond the Fields, a story based in Pakistan that touches on issues such as gender-based violence and justice. It is fascinating to understand what drove the author to write this incredible tale and what points she found most important to shed light on. This article is a great introduction to what is undoubtedly an amazing book.

4. We have to stop ignoring this massive Jeffrey Epstein conspiracy by Kari J

We have to stop ignoring this massive Jeffrey Epstein conspiracy

Kari lays out the facts of the Jeffrey Epstein issue step by step so that it is easy to understand one of the biggest conspiracies of the year. She urges sexual assault victims to continue to speak up, despite the many who aim to silence them.

5. It’s about time we see eating disorders as social justice issues by Meg Leach

It’s about time we see eating disorders as social justice issues

In this piece, Meg sheds some light on why in particular sizeism and diet culture contribute towards eating disorders and what we need to do to combat it. I’ve seen this topic discussed in so many ways but I feel like this article is a fresh take with a discussion around the causes, the impact, and the barriers to recovery.

6. This is the bitter truth behind your cup of tea by Iman Saleem

This is the bitter truth behind your cup of tea

We all love a good cup of tea, it’s prominent in many cultures and a staple in so many homes. But like most of the things we consume, how often do we really think about how it is made? Iman explores the struggles of the estate workers in Sri Lanka and the methods they are using to try and gain better wages and treatment. This is a great insight into a too little talked about subject.

7. #AmINext: we need to talk about femicide in South Africa by Erin de Kock

#AmINext: we need to talk about femicide in South Africa

The issue of femicide in South Africa is sadly not a new occurrence; this year the case of Uyinene Mrwetyana bought it back into the spotlight. Erin explores the question on everyone’s mind – Am I next? A fair question in a country where a woman is murdered every three hours.

8. Why the London dream is over by Sharlene Gandhi

Why the London dream is over

Sharlene looks into why people are leaving cities and focuses on London in particular. Looking at the near non-existent work-life balance, financial aspects and even climate issues, we can understand why more people are leaving London than moving to it.

9. We have to stop making straight celebrities our gay icons by Federica Bocco

We have to stop making straight celebrities our gay icons

While the relationship between music and the LGBTQ+ community is a historic one, Federica asks some important questions of who our icons should be. Without bashing allies, it is important to note that we can acknowledge and appreciate music by straight celebrities when supporting the cause, but not to forget to lift up and empower LGBTQ+ artists themselves.

So comes an end to a year that we will all remember for so many years to come.

Here is to 2020 – a year we hope is filled with goodness and justice.


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Mitta Thakrar

By Mitta Thakrar

Senior Now & Beyond Editor