Like every year, 2019 has its own staples of change marking it, especially in the fields of technology, money, science, and careers which our Now + Beyond is comprised of. However, at The Tempest, we aren’t ones to largely focus on the new “what” which has entered our lives but, rather, the connection it holds to us on a personal level.

Ahead, you’ll find nine of my favorite pieces published this past year. These articles span experiences, perspectives, and voices that we’ve been proud to publish and felt brought an important matter to light. Enjoy!

1. How ‘On This Day’ on Facebook inspires me to fight for the person I once was by Sian Ferguson

How ‘On This Day’ on Facebook inspires me to fight for the person I once was

I wonder if I’ll ever be happy again.

2019 has definitely brought to light many of Facebook’s questionable tactics and features, however, this author took a special interest in the social media platform’s ‘On This Day’ one where posts from years ago (same date, though) are shown. It’s a like-and-hate relationship for Ferguson who found a sense of comfort in her time capsule.

2. We’re all made of stardust. Here’s how by Sahar Arshad

We’re all made of stardust. Here’s how.

“93 percent stardust.” – Nikita Gill

There are over 7.8 billion people on Earth today, each holding different beliefs and from different backgrounds. There’s plenty to separate us, says Arshad, but stardust is what binds us. Read this riveting (and magical!) piece on the science behind our biological makeup as Arshad tells us to take to heart the next time someone calls you a star. 

3. We need to think long and hard about child entrepreneurs by Sharlene Gandhi

We need to think long and hard about child entrepreneurs

A twisted, neoliberal form of child labor.

It isn’t easy to be an entrepreneur. It takes a lot of passion, perseverance, hard work, and long nights. So when the author of this piece noticed a growing trend of child entrepreneurs (which, yes, is inspiring!) she raised concerns over the psychological impact it might be having over placing capitalistic burdens at such a young age.

4. The comments under Refinery29’s Money Diaries expose how much we love to hate talking about money by Sana Panjwani

The comments under Refinery29’s Money Diaries expose how much we love to hate talking about money

The public loves to hate – and hates to love – money diaries.

Financial voyeurism has reached a height of popularity that even the editor behind Refinery29’s money diaries wasn’t expecting. But to what end are certain individuals sharing their, by all accounts, private transactions? Is the community benefiting from learning of others’ salaries and spending habits or is this simply a new platform to pass off judgment?

This piece delves into the community and highlights an underlying issue women are taught to skirt around – their personal finances.

5. Logging off in times of turmoil by Mitta Thakrar

Logging off in times of turmoil

You have to prepare yourself.

Twitter is either the best or the worst, says Thakrar. She painfully recalls the Grenfell Tower fire of 2017 and how horrifying it was watching it unfold, unfiltered, over Twitter as the masses took to the platform to share and grieve over the tragedy. Then Gaza, then Paris, then New Zealand… and more and more. Is staying logged on worth it, she asks.

6. Why you need to get to a “Blue Space” as soon as possible by Morgen Henderson

Why you need to get to a “Blue Space” as soon as possible

Blue space living is a boon for the body.

It’s not only the people and work we surround ourselves with that matter to our physical and mental health but our physical environment too. Henderson highlights the importance of blue spaces – think water – in creating a healthier space. The piece lays out six more reasons why setting up camp near a blue space is beneficial.

7. Job hopping won’t ruin the careers of millennials. I’m proof of that by Noha Abu El Magd

Job hopping won’t ruin the careers of millennials. I’m proof of that.

We have to be good at many things all the time.

Lazy and unmotivated are not the words Abu El Magd would use to describe the millennial work force. It’s quite the opposite, in fact. Read this piece for some insight on the career paths Generation Y have had to take up post-economic crisis which many of them entered into during their early years of work or graduated into; a career matrix. 

8. What it really costs me to put away my phone by Maheen Humayun

What it really costs me to put away my phone

Is this the curse of being a millennial?

This captivating piece lays bare the struggle many of us face with screen addiction and the crutch it has become to distract ourselves from our daily struggles — scrolling endlessly in search for the proverbial “something.” Humayun evokes a familial emotion and circumstance that many can, unfortunately, relate to.

9. Facial recognition software is proving extremely deadly for marginalized communities by Anushka Singh

Facial recognition software is proving extremely deadly for marginalized communities

It’s astonishing that issues regarding human and civil rights required a vote.

In the kind of world we live in, projects proven to be discriminative, violating civil rights, and endangering people are up for debate rather than simply putting a stop to it. Singh, the writer behind this detailed piece, lays out example after example of facial discrimination against minorities and raises concerns over human bias driving algorithms to make the same errors they were originally invented to avoid. 

I’ve only been here on an interim capacity for the past three months but as we head into 2020, I’m excited to publish a plethora of engaging pieces across the vertical’s varied interests and bring to you (our lovely, lovely readers!) more content from as many voices as possible.

See you in 2020!


https://thetempest.co/?p=128380
Sana Panjwani

By Sana Panjwani

Senior Now+ BEYOND Editor