Politics, News

It looks like we forgot what America was built on when it comes to the Syrian refugee crisis

Oh wait, let's debate around the worst humanitarian crisis in decades, because - why?

Does anyone remember this excerpt from the poem, New Colossus, by Emma Lazarus, engraved on the Statue of Liberty?

“Give me your tired, your poor,
Your huddled masses yearning to breathe free,
The wretched refuse of your teeming shore.
Send these, the homeless, tempest-tossed, to me:
I lift my lamp beside the golden door.”

Cool. Now that we’ve got that little reminder out of the way, let’s look at the ridiculous conversation happening on Twitter right now under the hashtag #SyrianRefugee.

As a Syrian myself, the quick manner in which people jump back and forth on the issue has caused more than  a little heartburn. For now, watching the hashtag has proven to be frustrating enough. While more than a few tweets were against bringing in refugees in the wake of the Paris attacks, some were still in favor of the ability to bring relief to the worst humanitarian crisis in decades. 

Some were optimistic, fighting for the rights of Syrian refugees in the United States. Because, ya know – we’re meant to be the nation that brings in the people with no home.

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https://twitter.com/lunaxai/status/666638789154963459

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https://twitter.com/kabiriyengar/status/666648955380301826

Some compared it to the Biblical journey of Mary and Joseph, because they were refugees of Middle Eastern descent:

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Others, not so much. What stands out is the sheer lack of understanding, tolerance and empathy for a group of people that – wait for it – were seeking asylum in a time during which they are being blatantly persecuted.

Oh, wait. I forgot that most of these people haven’t really learned the history of their own nation – and why settlers came here to begin with. My bad.

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https://twitter.com/LadySandersfarm/status/666596906189979648

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Laila Alawa

Laila Alawa

Laila Alawa is the CEO and Founder of The Tempest, a leading media company where the world goes to hear the stories of diverse millennial women. She is also the host for The Expose, a weekly podcast tackling tough topics with snark and wit. Her work has been mentioned in The Guardian, BuzzFeed, The Atlantic, Mashable, Color Lines, Bustle, Feministing, The Washington Post, and The Boston Globe. She's also appeared on Al-Jazeera America, BBC World News, NPR, and Huffington Post Live.

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